Chemistry:Essential2
Sustainability

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There are now over 7 billion of us on the planet with more than 1 billion more coming in just the next ten years. Our needs are rather basic–clean water, shelter, healthcare and a safe, abundant food supply. But with every new technological innovation, and every lifestyle enhancement, it is our desires that are creating some of the world’s greatest sustainability challenges.

Fortunately, as our footprint on the planet has expanded, so too has our command of science. And at the center of all scientific progress, it is the innovative people and products of chemistry that are proving essential to creating the solutions that help us live healthier, longer, and more productive lives.

Chemistry:Essential2
Economic Growth

Cell phones, water bottles, home furnishings, sports equipment, medical devices, even our clothing. Most of the things we come in contact with everyday begin as a natural gas molecule.

That’s why chemists refer to natural gas as a “feedstock.”

In a chemical plant called a cracker, molecules are broken apart and then reassembled to make the materials we use in countless everyday products.

Access to vast new supplies of American natural gas from shale deposits is one of the most exciting domestic energy developments in decades. This energy “game changer” is helping create hundreds of thousands of new jobs, and improve trade, all while contributing to the sustainable solutions essential to a better world.

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Chemistry:Essential2
American Jobs

Chemistry is the bedrock of American manufacturing and is essential to our economy.  It plays a vital role in the creation of products that make our world healthier, safer, more sustainable and more productive. In fact, virtually everything we come in contact with every day is directly touched by the products of chemistry.

Currently more than 800,000 Americans rely on skilled, good-paying jobs in the chemistry industry—earning on average $94,000 a year.

Developing and producing the products of chemistry creates a ripple effect that is responsible for more than six million additional U.S. jobs and 26 percent of America’s GDP.  Chemistry touches nearly every area of our economy including the automotive, building and construction, agriculture, technology, and retail industries.

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Chemistry:Essential2
Sustainability

We all want our children, and their children, to inherit a clean, sustainable, thriving world. Achieving this requires identifying and promoting policies and strategies that leverage the proven performance of our expanding portfolio of chemical product and technology innovations.

Specifically, our vehicles, homes and offices need to be increasingly energy efficient.

An abundant, safe food supply and clean, fresh drinking water must support a growing population.

Perhaps most profoundly, technologies and techniques must be employed to help halt, and ultimately reverse, environmental pollutants and greenhouse gas emissions

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Chemistry:Essential2
Health

Plastic blood that mimics hemoglobin. Artificial skin that lets prosthetic wearers sense touch and temperature. Nanotechnologies that deliver custom designed drugs based on a patient’s DNA. These and many other remarkable breakthroughs in health care are made possible by innovations in chemistry.

In many parts of the world the key to improved health is simply a matter of providing safe drinking water and access to nutritional food. Chemistry solutions are helping populations across the globe prevent and treat illnesses and diseases so that we can live longer, healthier, more productive and enjoyable lives.

Chemistry:Essential2
Our Future

Given recent and future innovations in chemistry, we have every reason to be optimistic about our future.

The science exists to reduce illness , improve the environment, save energy and unlock even more value from our natural resources.

If America is to remain a country that innovates it must do so with a thriving American chemical industry. Protecting that unique role is essential to a better future.

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